Great analogy to show people who have trouble understanding Geology’s Law of Superposition.

Great analogy to show people who have trouble understanding Geology’s Law of Superposition.

What happens when you tell a Paleo-artist to “have fun with it” when tasked with creating signage indicating the location of portable restrooms? A Tyrannosaur using the lavatory.A tricky feat to be sure, considering that the tail gets in the way. So I depicted him using the toilet in reverse - or the way John Harington intended, if you watch South Park.*

What happens when you tell a Paleo-artist to “have fun with it” when tasked with creating signage indicating the location of portable restrooms? A Tyrannosaur using the lavatory.

A tricky feat to be sure, considering that the tail gets in the way. So I depicted him using the toilet in reverse - or the way John Harington intended, if you watch South Park.*

Ah. I think I know where this is coming from. Someone on Jurassic Fight Club was claimed that T. rex teeth had pits between serrations that could hold bits of its meals so bacteria could grow. He argued this would have given T. rex a “komodo dragon - like bite”. (A National Geographic Documentary on T. rex also made the same claim, though with less elaboration).Of course, this reasoning is flawed; recent studies have found that komodo dragons (as well as other species of monitor) actually possess rudimentary venom glands in their lower jaw, and do not rely on poor dental hygiene to kill prey:

"Research in 2013 suggested that the bacteria in the mouths of komodo dragons are ordinary and similar to those found in other carnivores. They actually have surprisingly good mouth hygiene. As Bryan Fry put it: "After they are done feeding, they will spend 10 to 15 minutes lip-licking and rubbing their head in the leaves to clean their mouth… Unlike people have been led to believe, they do not have chunks of rotting flesh from their meals on their teeth, cultivating bacteria." The observation of prey dying of sepsis would then be explained by the natural instinct of water buffalos, who are not native to the islands where the Komodo dragon lives, to run into water when attacked. The warm, feces filled water would then cause the infections.[36] The study used samples from 16 captive dragons (10 adults and six neonates) from three U.S. zoos.[37]" - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komodo_dragon#Saliva

Ah. I think I know where this is coming from. Someone on Jurassic Fight Club was claimed that T. rex teeth had pits between serrations that could hold bits of its meals so bacteria could grow. He argued this would have given T. rex a “komodo dragon - like bite”. (A National Geographic Documentary on T. rex also made the same claim, though with less elaboration).

Of course, this reasoning is flawed; recent studies have found that komodo dragons (as well as other species of monitor) actually possess rudimentary venom glands in their lower jaw, and do not rely on poor dental hygiene to kill prey:

"Research in 2013 suggested that the bacteria in the mouths of komodo dragons are ordinary and similar to those found in other carnivores. They actually have surprisingly good mouth hygiene. As Bryan Fry put it: "After they are done feeding, they will spend 10 to 15 minutes lip-licking and rubbing their head in the leaves to clean their mouth… Unlike people have been led to believe, they do not have chunks of rotting flesh from their meals on their teeth, cultivating bacteria." The observation of prey dying of sepsis would then be explained by the natural instinct of water buffalos, who are not native to the islands where the Komodo dragon lives, to run into water when attacked. The warm, feces filled water would then cause the infections.[36] The study used samples from 16 captive dragons (10 adults and six neonates) from three U.S. zoos.[37]" - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komodo_dragon#Saliva

(Source: palaeofail)

totallynotagentphilcoulson:

I’ve been waiting for Phil Tippett to respond to this joke

(Source: kgrrsten, via ieffinglovedinosaurs)

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via prehistoric-birds)

prehistoric-birds:

Xiaotingia zhengi chick by EmilHerran

D’awww…

I’m intrigued. Reminiscent of the Star Wars Episode I ecosystem building game that Lucas Learning produced years ago…

Some photographs and form studies of geese I’ve been working on recently.

Observed behavior of Branta canadensis.